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Limiting the THC Content In Edibles

One of the things that I am consistently asking myself whenever I visit a new state and dispensary is Why their edibles are always at 100 MG packs or below (usually 25mg or 50mg packs). Typically, you will find these packs of edibles in 10mg or 5mg doses (roughly labeled). Most of these restrictions come from the state in terms of dictating what the type of edible can be, as well as how much the dosage can go up to. In this article we are specifically discussing edibles that are lab tested, run through the system, and sold at dispensaries. Not the allegedly 600mg Nerd Rope you can buy off the dude at the vape shop. Dosing labels are a huge issue in the industry especially as it pertains to the real quality and quantity an advertised dose is supposed to be delivering, but we don’t need to get into that right now.

The Current Edible Dilemma

On the surface, having doses maxed out makes some sense; you don’t want people taking more than they should be. However, it presents real issue to medical patients who have developed somewhat of a tolerance to edibles and need higher doses for their treatments. There are different laws in place for medical patients in states that limit the THC content on recreational edibles. For example, I was in Vegas, they took my medical card from out of state, and I had access to 1 500mg Edible, the only one on the menu. It was a solid chocolate bar don’t get me wrong, but the selection was incredibly limited. If I was allergic to cocoa or dairy, I would have been in serious trouble.

Who is Responsible for Edible Innovation?

Growers and manufacturers of edibles have obviously either abided by what the state was telling them to do as it pertains to the max THC you can have in an edible. More likely, manufacturers realized that the amount of true medical patients that had access to higher dose edibles was severely limited compared to that of regular recreational users. The demand was there because the state created the framework for that demand to exist. By limiting reciprocity and where medical cards qualify, by limiting the amount and type of THC edible you could sell, they created an inherent market that it only makes sense for growers to spend more on developing different types of edibles; honey, lemonade, popsicles, Cheetos, gummies to name a few. In addition, the very people who would be helped the most are hurt due to the lack of product development in the medical sphere at higher doses.

What Are Possible Solutions?

Growers and manufacturers of edibles have obviously either abided by what the state was telling them to do as it pertains to the max THC you can have in an edible. More likely, manufacturers realized that the amount of true medical patients that had access to higher dose edibles was severely limited compared to that of regular recreational users. The demand was there because the state created the framework for that demand to exist. By limiting reciprocity and where medical cards qualify, by limiting the amount and type of THC edible you could sell, they created an inherent market that it only makes sense for growers to spend more on developing different types of edibles; honey, lemonade, popsicles, Cheetos, gummies to name a few. In addition, the very people who would be helped the most are hurt due to the lack of product development in the medical sphere at higher doses.

There are a couple of potential solutions to this problem. The first, and one we have discussed many times before is federal reciprocity and more guidance for uniformity amongst the states as it pertains to the development of edibles that contain THC. Even different states have limits on what types of edibles can be made, and how much the dosage can be. For example, in Alaska you can be sold no more than 50mg of THC up to 10 servings per pack (500 MG Total). In Oregon, edibles can contain no more than 5mg of THC with 10 servings up to 50 MG (this doesn’t apply to capsules where the limit is 50mg, 500mg per pack). Some semblance of uniformity across the board could ease confusion amongst the public.

State Sponsored Stoner Program?

Another question we often ask ourselves is why? Why does the government dictate the dosing parameters? Part of it is controlling the amount on person could take (although in theory, you could buy 10 packs like many did during the pandemic and accomplish the same thing for a much higher price), but it is also, allegedly, helping to curb the use amongst youth. Many think that if edibles are gummies, kids will be more prone to use them. Then the right turns it into a state sponsored stoner program, which I would happily join immediately. At the end of the day, these issues are the same things alcohol, tobacco, vapes, etc have been through. A natural advertising evolution that starts targeting youth and gets you hooked from there. However, I would argue cannabis is unlike any of the aforementioned substances. It is prescribed by a doctor in some cases, and in all cases does not cause the harm to yourself or those around you nearly as much. The thinking regarding cannabis has to change, and with-it proper legislation that actually makes sense for the community will arise. Until that point, we are stuck with guessing doses on rice Krispy treats and buying 20 packs at a time.

https://www.apha.org/~/media/files/pdf/topics/state_cannabis_policy.ashx

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